Login

Signup

Photo and information provided by The Aspen Institute

Two-Generation Approach

Two-generation approaches provide opportunities for and meet the needs of children and their parents together. They build education, economic assets, social capital, and health and well being to create a legacy of economic security that passes from one generation to the next. New Hope Ministries believe the two-generation approach helps both generations make progress together.

Governor Tom Wolf’s Food Security Partnership

A BLUEPRINT FOR A HUNGER-FREE PA

The blueprint addresses the Commonwealth’s commitment to alleviating hunger.  The mission is to provide Pennsylvanians with access to healthy, nutritious food, which will improve their well-being, health, and independence.

Nine Marks of a Healthy Parachurch Ministry

By: J. Mack Stiles

Parachurch ministries work hand-in-hand with the local church community. What exactly is a parachurch and what makes a healthy parachurch?  This article illustrates nine marks of a healthy parachurch ministry in today’s world.

Best Practices: Innovations and Solutions Developed by Hunger Relief Agencies in Washington State.

By: Washington Food Coalition

Developed as part of the Emergency Food Assistance Program’s Capacity Building Project, this catalog features best practices which can be replicated by emergency food providers. Catalog profiles are identified with visual indicators representing food banks, meal programs, distribution centers, and ideas which everyone can use.

The High Cost of Youth Unemployment

By: By Sarah Ayres Steinberg

Poverty Interrupted

Applying Behavioral Science to the Context of Chronic Scarcity

By: ideas42

Breaking the Cycle of Inter-Generational Poverty For Good

In an effort to help children and their families break out of this cycle of poverty, ideas42 has embarked on a new initiative called Poverty Interrupted (PI). The application of behavioral science to this endemic problem could lead not only to improved lives, but also to more efficient deployment of limited public resources.

Workforce Development as an Antipoverty Strategy:  What Do We Know? What Should We Do?

By: Harry J. Holzer

This paper notes the basic paradox of workforce development policy: that, in an era in which skills are more important than ever as determinants of labor market earnings, we spend fewer public (federal) dollars on workforce development over time. Includes trends in funding and how the major federal programs at the Department of Labor and other agencies have evolved over time.

Reducing Child Poverty by Promoting Child Well Being

By: Elizabeth K. Anthony